Corn season is just starting to hit high gear around Broome County. So what do you do with all those corn cobs you have left after you strip them for those luscious corn salads? Make corn Cob wine!

You really didn’t think I was going to tell you to just throw them away did you?!?!? Silly people…Waste not, want not, and this is actually very tasty! This is a fast, easy recipe that is a perfect introduction into the home wine making process.

Corn Cob Wine

Yield: One Gallon US
Ingredients:

1 dozen raw corn cobs
1 gallon boiling water
2 pkgs yeast
9 cups of sugar

Instructions: 1. Place cobs in a container and pour boiling water over them.

2. Cover loosely with cheesecloth or a dish towel and let stand for 24 hours.

3. Remove the cobs and add the yeast and sugar.

4. Cover loosely again and let stand for 9 days.

5. Strain through cheesecloth, cover loosely, and store in a moderately cool place until it is fermented, which may take as long as 10 weeks.

6. Bottle and enjoy!

So what are you going to do with all that delicious sweet corn you stripped to get those cobs? How about a wonderful salad that is crunchy sweet and perfect paired with some gorgeous chops from McRey Farm or Laughing Crow farm or one of the others locally that have sweet, succulant Tamworth (and other heritage breeds) pork.

Corn and Black Bean Salad

1 can cooked black beans, drained and rinsed
3 cups fresh corn kernels, steamed briefly and cooled
1/2 green pepper, chopped
1/2 red pepper, chopped
2 green onions, sliced
1 tablespoon minced parsley
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Toss together ingredients, except pepper and then generously season to taste. Cover and refrigerate. This salad improves upon sitting, best if made the day before.

Fresh Corn Salad

DRESSING
1/4 cup olive oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon fresh minced garlic
2 teaspoons dijon mustard
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
2 tablespoons fresh Florida parsley, chopped fine

SALAD
1 pound salad greens, mixed
1 avocado, large cubes
1/2 cup black beans, cooked and rinsed
1/2 cup corn kernels, cooked
1/2 cup papaya, chopped or sliced

1.    Combine first seven ingredients and mix well. Refrigerate.

2.    Place prepared salad greens, avocado, black beans, corn kernels, and papaya in salad bowl.

3.    Pour dressing over salad and serve.

Yield: 4 to 6 servings

So now you are armed with some fun things to try, please drop me a note or leave a comment if you try them!

Colleen

The Farm at Nanticoke Creek

The Farm at Nanticoke Creek, is a small family farm in the Southern Tier of New York. Heritage breeds of waterfowl, poultry and game birds are raised, using 100% organic farming methods and pasturing.


Colleen has a long time love of food, wine, art and design and hosts the internet’s oldest, and favorite resource for the home wine maker at HomeMadeWine.net.
Her blog and websites are viewed by thousands each day who enjoy her recipes, photographs and helpful kitchen tips.

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Rebellious dough

Day 11! We are almost to the end. What shall we do next? Pasta Sauces? How about Cordials? OOOOOHHH! Let’s do Cordials! Will all the summer fruits coming into season that would be fun! Ok…we’ll start 12 days of Cordials starting the 7th of July.  Fun!

Here is our salad for Day 11

Super Easy Grilled Tuna Salad

from the american pasta council – serves 4 as a main course 12 as a side

16 oz fusilli
12 oz fresh tuna steak, cooked rare
3 T olive oil
4 T grey poupon mustard
6 T rice wine vinegar
Grated rind of 3 limes, finely chopped
6 fresh parsley sprigs, chopped
2 T low-sodium soy sauce
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 t dried dill weed
1 c  chopped red bell pepper
1 c  green beans, julienne, blanched
2/3 c red onion, pared, thinly sliced

cut tuna into small bite-size pieces; reserve. Cook pasta; drain and rinse with cold water. Combine all dressing ingredients; mix well. Toss together pasta, peppers, beans, onions, tuna and dressing. If possible, refrigerate salad overnight to allow flavors to blend. Serve cold.

The arm is bad, I won’t know anything until I get an MRI scheduled for next week. Thanks for all the emails, it’s hard to cook like this!!!!!!!!!!! (Here we go again with the whine and pity! 🙂 )

So what are you making for the 4th?  We’re having the Salad form Day 8 some nice grilled veggies and whatever meat I can get form the farms up the road or the farmer’s market. I’m so crunched for time and my schedule is making farmers market visits crazy. Plus it hurts to drive (whine, whine, whine) and I will most likely lose a digit with my newly developed Barney Rubble knife skills thanks to the pain and numbness (God, I still love that line from Top Chef-remember Casey chopping those onions?!?!?) in my arm, ughhh….whine, whine, whine, whine, whine…

All this whining gives me a great idea! Maybe I’ll sit on my behind all weekend and let the family cook and chauffeur me around and I’ll drink wine! Wine, wine, wine, wine… 🙂

Sounds like a great plan to me!

Have a great Wednesday and do something delicious!

Creatively serving the Greater Binghamton area in the lovely Southern Tier of NY. www.foodwineartdesign.com

Colleen is a private caterer and personal chef, she also hosts the internet’s favorite resource for the home wine maker at www.homemadewine.net. Her blog  and websites are viewed by thousands each day who enjoy her simply explained, illustrated and photographed recipes and helpful tips.

So here we are on day 10, are you inspired yet?!?!? Todays recipe is adapted a recipe by the American Pork Council and is scrumptious. You’ll make this often, trust me…it’s that good.

Grilled Pork Salad (serves 6)

3 cups grilled pork loin cut to 1/4 inch thick strips, chilled
3 cups cooked Orzo, chilled
1 cup coarsely chopped walnuts
1/4 cup chopped red onion
1 cup cubed fresh pineapple, chilled
1 cup sliced fresh mushrooms
1/2 pound spinach leaves or purple kale
1 cup fresh raspberries
1 papaya, sliced
1/3 cup raspberry vinegar
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 teaspoons honey
1/4 teaspoon salt

Combine raspberry vinegar, olive oil, honey and salt in jar. Cover; shake well. Pour dressing over combined pork, rice, walnuts, onion, pineapple and mushrooms. Toss lightly. Arrange spinach on large serving platter or salad bowl; top with pork mixture.

Arrange raspberries and papaya on top.

Ok…this isn’t a pasta salad but it is so good I had to post it. WOW!

Warm Beet and Onion Salad

From: Weber’s Big Book of Grilling

2   medium golden beets with leafy tops, about 2-1/2 inches in diameter each
2   medium red beets with leafy tops, about 2-1/2 inches in diameter each
    Extra-virgin olive oil

For the dressing:

1   medium orange
1/3   cup extra-virgin olive oil
2   tablespoons red wine vinegar
1   tablespoon finely sliced fresh basil
1   teaspoon minced garlic
1/2   teaspoon kosher salt
    Freshly ground black pepper
 
1   large red onion, cut into four 1/2-inch slices
2   hearts romaine lettuce

Trim the leafy tops from the beets, leaving about 1/2 inch attached; reserve the tops. Leave the root ends intact. Scrub the beets under cold water. Lightly spray or brush with olive oil. Grill over Indirect Medium heat until tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, 1 to 1-1/2 hours depending on size, turning once halfway through grilling time. Remove from the grill and allow to stand until cool enough to handle. Trim the ends from the beets and discard. Rub off the skins. Cut the beets into 1/4 to 1/2-inch slices and place the red beets and the golden beets in separate bowls (to keep the red beets from dying the golden beets red).

To make the dressing: Wash the dry the orange. With a zester, scrape off 1 tablespoon of zest. Alternatively, use a vegetable peeler to remove enough strips of zest to total 1 tablespoon when finely chopped. Reserve the zest.

Cut the remaining skin and white pith from the orange and, working over a separate medium bowl, separate the orange into sections, letting the sections and any juice fall into the bowl. Add the reserved zest and the remaining dressing ingredients to the orange sections, including pepper to taste. Gently stir to combine.

Lightly brush the onion slices with some of the dressing and grill over Direct Medium heat until tender, 10 to 12 minutes, turning once halfway through grilling time. Remove from the grill and allow to cool slightly, then separate into rings.

Rinse the reserved leafy tops of the beets under cold water. Select the smallest, most tender leaves and place with the romaine lettuce in a large bowl. Add half of the dressing and toss. Divide the lettuce mixture among four salad plates. Top with the beets and the onion rings and drizzle on the remaining dressing. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Makes 4 servings.

I missed getting in on the Daring Bakers for July, so I have wait (sniff, sniff) until August. I guess that’s ok since I am headed to the doctors today to have them look at this arm again and see what’s up. I have an overwhelming tolerance for pain, seriously, ask anyone who knows me. This arm is KILLING ME. I can’t sleep, the pain makes me nauseous, I can’t even drive my car without agony. I’ll update you after I spend the majority of the day in the Doctor’s office…ughh….

Have a fabulous Tuesday and do something delicious!

Creatively serving the Greater Binghamton area in the lovely Southern Tier of NY. www.foodwineartdesign.com

Colleen is a private caterer and personal chef, she also hosts the internet’s favorite resource for the home wine maker at www.homemadewine.net. Her blog is viewed by thousands each day who enjoy her simply explained, illustrated and photographed recipes and helpful tips.

I found this one in my organized pile (haha!) of salad recipes ripped from magazines. I can’t tell which one since it is all but a scrap, but it is a good one and I make it often for parties. This is the original recipe, with my changes and comments added. My version is tastier 😉

1 pound Radiatore, Rotini, or other medium pasta shape, uncooked (I use Fusilli, it looks great in this)
6 tablespoons vegetable oil ( I use extra virgin olive oil)
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1 pound skinless, boneless fresh salmon fillets or frozen salmon fillets, cooked and chopped
OR
2 7 1/2-ounce cans salmon, drained and flaked
(I use boneless skinless seared in light sesame oil)
1 papaya (if unavailable, substitute 1 mango or 2 peaches, or 2 nectarines), peeled, seeded and chopped
OR
1 15-ounce can papaya, or favorite fruit in light syrup, drained and chopped
( I use fresh papaya)
1 cup cherry tomatoes
1 bunch scallions, finely sliced
1 yellow bell pepper, seeded, ribs removed and chopped
1 medium cucumber, quartered lengthwise and sliced
1 small jalapeño, seeded, ribs removed and finely minced
2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
OR
2 teaspoons dried cilantro
(I’ve only use fresh cilantro because I have a surplus of it growing here in the summer)
3 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
3 tablespoons white wine vinegar
3 drops hot sauce

1. Prepare pasta according to package directions; drain and transfer to a medium bowl.

2. While pasta is still warm, mix in vegetable oil. Season with freshly ground black pepper. Set pasta aside to cool.

3. In a medium mixing bowl, add the salmon, papaya, tomatoes, scallions, yellow pepper and cucumber. Toss together with pasta.

4. In a small bowl, combine the jalapeño, cilantro, both vinegars and hot sauce. Toss the pasta with the dressing and refrigerate. Serve well chilled.

Serves 6-8

Note to self…start organizing the pile of magazine recipes

I received this in my email this morning from The Horses and Humans Research Foundation. It is the results of a study on the impact of equine therapy on children with cerebral palsy. Here is the link…

http://www.horsesandhumans.org/WUfinal_press_release.pdf

Good news for families, and good news for equine therapy!

We are having these for dinner tonight. They looked sooooo good and we love Tempeh, so look for a review tomorrow.

Almond Crusted Tempeh Burger

Not sure what I’ll throw together to go with them, but the Fresh Corn & Summer vegetables with Arame Seaweed looks pretty good. I’m really crunched for time so we’ll see what we end up with!

Have a great Thursday and do something delicious!

Colleen
Creatively serving the Greater Binghamton area in the lovely Southern Tier of NY. www.foodwineartdesign.com

Colleen is a private caterer and personal chef, she also hosts the internet’s favorite resource for the home wine maker at www.homemadewine.net. Her blog and websites are viewed by thousands each day who enjoy her simply explained, illustrated and photographed recipes and helpful tips.

“on the thrid day of pasta my true love said to me…”

nevermind… 🙂

This is yet another tried and true recipe that has a bit of tartness from dried cherries.

10 oz orecchiette pasta ( or 3 cups)
3/4 c dried tart cherries
1/2 c chopped carrots
1/2 c chopped cucumber
1/4 c chopped green onions
1/4 c red wine vinegar
3 T vegetable oil
2 T freashly squeezed lemon juice
2 T champagne garlic mustard
1 T fresh basil chiffonade cut
1/2 T fresh oregano chopped
3/4 t fresh lemon thyme
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1. Cook pasta according to package directions. Drain well. In a large bowl, combine pasta, cherries, carrots, cucumber and green onions; mix gently.

2. In a small bowl, combine vinegar, oil, lemon juice, mustard, basil, oregano, thyme and pepper; mix well. Pour over pasta mixture; mix gently. Refrigerate, covered, at least 2 hours, or overnight. Mix gently before serving.

It’s no secret that I am a cookbook hoarder. I have cookbooks everywhere… my family and friends fear that it borders on unhealthy so I told them I would start cleaning out some of my stash.  So starting now, and running through July 31st, 2008 you can have your chance at the all new monthly cookbook giveaway! whooo hooo!

Here’s how it works…

Just email me with your first name and a valid email address (because I’ll need to contact you to send you the book) and I will throw it into a fishbowl. On the first of the month following the end of the drawing period (ie…August 1st, 2008 for entries received now through July 31st, 2008) I will draw a name and the cookbook is yours! This months cookbook will have a bonus book too, just for the fun of it. The bonus book is….

Why I bought this cookbook I have no idea? I am thinking that the title led me to believe that it was more “from scratch” food and not the convenience stuff she usually uses. It is geared toward low carb recipes however, some are actually really interesting. So that is the bonus book for July! How exciting!

Have a wonderful Tuesday and do something delicious!

Colleen
Creatively serving the Greater Binghamton area in the lovely Southern Tier of NY. www.foodwineartdesign.com

Colleen is a private caterer and personal chef, she also hosts the internet’s favorite resource for the home wine maker at www.homemadewine.net. Her blog and websites are viewed by thousands each day who enjoy her simply explained, illustrated and photographed recipes and helpful tips.

I make it no secret that I dislike mayo laden salads and I have been finding PILES of folks lately who feel the same way so I thought that maybe we would do 12 days of pasta salads to countdown to the July 4th weekend…how does that sound??!??!

This is an old standby and probably the easiest to make in the world. If you really dislike prepping vegetable swing by the salad bar or the packaged vegetable isle in your supermarket. Wegman’s has a huge selection of prepared vegetables or vegetables that will cut your prep time significantly.

Summer Pasta Salad

serves 8 – easily adjusted for larger gatherings. I generally make this to serve 25 as it can be a main course salad too.


DRESSING:
1/2 c olive or salad oil
1 t salt
1/8 t crushed red pepper
1 clove garlic minced
1/4 c lemon juice
1/4 t freshly ground black pepper
1 T snipped fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried basil leaves

SALAD:
1 T salt
8 oz fusilli pasta
8 oz grape tomatoes
1/2 c cubed red pepper
1/2 c cubed green pepper
1/2 c cubed spanish onion (I love to use vidalia’s when in season)
1/4 lb provolone cheese, cubed
1/4 lb mozzarella cheese, cubed
1 20-oz can canned garbanzo beans, drained
1/4 lb dry salami, slice into quarters
1/4 c small pitted black olives
4 medium mushrooms, washed and sliced
2 T chopped parsley
2 T torn fresh basil
1 T fresh oregano

1. Combine dressing ingredients and whisk until well blended

2. In a large pot bring 3 quarts water, salt and salad oil to a boil. Add pasta; bring back to boiling; cook uncovered stirring occasionally with long fork to prevent sticking, just until tender, about 7 to 8 minutes. Do not over cook. Drain well; do not rinse.

3. Turn into large bowl; add dressing mixture; toss gently to combine. Cool completely. To pasta mixture, add salad ingredients; toss lightly to combine. Turn into serving bowl; Refrigerate covered 1 hour.

Clients and family have told me they prefer this salad at room temperature rather than chilled and I tend to agree.


Dear home wine makers in the Southern Tier, we are hoping to put together a gathering for August. We will meet in the greater Binghamton area somewhere centrally located to make it easy for members to get to. Gas prices are so crazy I don’t want anyone to have to go any farther than necessary.

Emails this week have been from many, many new wine makers…hooray! Good to have you with us! Please feel free to post questions on HomeMadeWine.net any time. The purpose of the forum is to have questions and answers available to help all who may need it. There are no silly questions…except the one not asked!

Wine made with summer fruits is the most popular category right now on HMW so I have been highlighting a few really simple and delicious recipes here for those of you who haven’t visited HMW yet. Strawberry season is in full swing here in the Southern Tier so I thought I would share one of the most popular Strawberry wine recipes with you.

Strawberry Wine

Yield: One Gallon US

Ingredients:

4 lbs. strawberries
2 lbs. sugar
1 gal. water
1/2 tsp. yeast nutrient
1/2 tsp. pectic enzyme
1/2 tsp. acid blend
1/4 tsp. grape tannin
1/4 tsp. potassium sorbate
1 tsp bentonite
1 pkg wine yeast

Instructions:

  1. Heat water to near boiling, add berries and crush.
  2. Cool and add all other ingredients Except the Potassium sorbate.
  3. Place in fermenter and proceed as with grape wine, breaking cap daily.
  4. Rack after a week and again 3 weeks later.
  5. Continue to ferment until clear and the PA reaches 0%.
  6. Add the Postassium Sorbate to stabilize and bottle as usual.

Don’t be afraid of the chemical names or unusual terms…these are common and food safe additives that will protect your wine and let is become the best it can be.

The tutorial and equipment list is located here and supplies that you need can be purchased at Doc’s homebrew or your local Brewer supply shop. There are several online as well. It should cost you around $35 in equipment in supplies to make your first wine. After that all you do is replace you basic needs such as stabilizers, cleaners and things of that nature. Your largest expense will be your glass carboys (usually around $25-30) and you are better off trying to get them locally because shipping is a killer.

What’s for dinner tonight? Leftovers! It has been a cooking marathon around here and today we are going to just pick and graze at all the dribs and drabs that are stashed in the fridge. Speaking of strawberries…We have to bottle our 2007 Sangiovese today, which has some nice strawberry notes. It’s always exciting when you bottle a wine!

Have a wonderful Sunday and do something delicious!

Colleen
Creatively serving the Greater Binghamton area in the lovely Southern Tier of NY. www.foodwineartdesign.com

Colleen is a private caterer and personal chef, she also hosts the internet’s favorite resource for the home wine maker at www.homemadewine.net. Her blog and websites are viewed by thousands each day who enjoy her simply explained, illustrated and photographed recipes and helpful tips.

Well Puddles came to live with us last night…what a cutie! This is a duck with the lives of a cat. He already has lived to be the ripe old age of one with a broken leg. That’s a lucky duck! Now he survives a horrible stomping accident, what would you do?!??!? This duck deserves a chance to recover and have a good life here on the farm. Last night when I brought him home we had been thinking we would splint the newly broken leg and give him a chance to hopefully learn to compensate for it.  He had been using his wing a bit for support but last night when I was checking him over after dinner he was standing up fully supported with his other leg and looking like he was starting to put a little pressure on the broken one. That’s a huge improvement! So I think we will let him go un-splinted and see how he learns to adapt with it. He will be in a protected environment so all he needs to do is be able to waddle around boss the ladies and swim and eat…the good life. 🙂

Here he is…meet Puddles!

He is very sweet and already has learned that he loves my “duck salad” which is just a blend of chopped up greens, cabbage and things like that.  I have to pick him up a bigger pool today or tomorrow, it will probably be a fruitless search as the heatwave is returning today…ughh…

Friday is my “day-off”  which translates to “catch up on all the work that you didn’t get finished during the week”. I was hoping to head out to the St. Anthony Feast Days today but I don’t think I am going to have time.  It goes on tomorrow and Sunday too, so hopefully I will get down there, the sidewalk artists are FABULOUS!

So what’s for dinner tonight? hmmmm….it’s going to be brutally hot so perhaps we will do a really quick tortellini with some roasted red peppers, rappi and garlic and a nice cool crisp salad.

Have a great weekend everyone, I will be working on some sample menus that I may post for my readers to to try and give feedback on. It will depend on the weather at this point. We may just stay inside and bottle some of the reds that are ready instead!

Colleen

Creatively serving the Greater Binghamton area in the lovely Southern Tier of NY. www.foodwineartdesign.com

Colleen Cheechalk is a private caterer and personal chef, she also hosts the internet’s favorite resource for the home wine maker at www.homemadewine.net. Her blog is viewed by thousands each day who enjoy her simply explained, illustrated and photographed recipes and helpful tips.