Yield: One Gallon US
Beginning SG/PA: 1.085

Ingredients:
2 qts. watermelon juice
2 qts. water
1 1/2 lbs. sugar
2 1/2 tsp. acid blend
1/8 tsp. tannin
1 tsp. yeast nutrient
1 campden tablet, crushed
1 pkg. wine yeast

Instructions:

  1. Cut melons into quarters, remove all rind parts entirely and discard seeds. Cut meat of melons into cubes.
  2. Using nylon straining bag, mash and squeeze out juice into primary fermentor. Keeping all pulp in primary, tie bag and place in primary.
  3. Stir in all other ingredients EXCEPT yeast. Cover Primary.
  4. After 24 hours add yeast. Cover Primary
  5. Stir daily and check S.G.
  6. When ferment reaches S.G. of 1.040 (3-5 days) lightly press juice from bag. Syphon wine off sediment into glass secondary. Attach airlock.
  7. When ferment is complete (S.G. dropped to 1.000 — about 3 weeks) syphon off sediment into clean secondary. reattach airlock.
  8. To aid clearing syphon again in two months and again if necessary before bottling.

This wine is delightful! Those of us who plant watermelon each year always have an abundance. Now instead of woefully begging your neighbors to live on your extras, you can enjoy a taste of summer when the cool winds of fall start blowing in.  Enjoy!

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We are heading into raspberry season here in upstate NY so we felt that a recipe featuring raspberries would be the perfect kickoff for our Featured Wine Recipe for July 2008. We realize that many of our readers reside outside the US where fresh raspberries may be difficult to find so we selected this specific version for its ease and compatibility.

Please feel free to post comments, questions or your own experiences so that all can benefit. Thanks!

Raspberry Wine

Yield: One Gallon US
Beginning SG/PA: Not Provided

Ingredients:
3 1/2 lbs. raspberries
3 lbs. sugar
1 1/2 tsp. acid blend
1/2 tsp. grape tannin
1/2 tsp. pectic enzyme
1 tsp. yeast nutrient
2 campden tablets, crushed
1 pkg. wine yeast

Instructions:

  1. Mash berries into a primary fermentor.
  2. Add sufficient water to make 1 imperial gallon (1 1/4 US gallon).
  3. Add remaining ingredients except yeast.
  4. Let sit 24 hours.
  5. Add yeast.
  6. Ferment for 6 days.
  7. Strain and put in secondary fermentor.
  8. Rack in 3 weeks and again in 3 months.
  9. Clarify, stabilize, bottle and age as expected.

Colleen is a private caterer and personal chef, she also hosts the internet’s favorite resource for the home wine maker at www.homemadewine.net. Her blog and websites are viewed by thousands each day who enjoy her simply explained, illustrated and photographed recipes and helpful tips.

At the end of this month my husband and I will have been the hosts of HomemadeWine.net for an entire year. We have enjoyed getting to know many of regular visitors and the many, many new folks who have found us this year.

To celebrate and to keep up with the changing trends we are taking homemadewine.net to a blog based format.  Rather than using the forums, visitors will be able to leave comments for each other right on the recipe or post they are viewing.  Helpful comments will be converted to posts so that all can benefit, and you will be able to easily share your recipes with others.

Some new additions:

  • Wine of the Month.  Each month a wine recipe will be posted and you are welcome to make this wine and share your experiences with everyone in journal fashion by leaving your comments.
  • Wine Recipe e-book with many of the wine and food recipes you find here
  • unique wine and food themed gifts

We hope that these changes make visiting homemadewine.net a pleasure and that you will continue to visit us often and enjoy the recipes and friendly help and advice that you have come to know expect from homemadewine.net.

Thanks!

Colleen and Family

Day 12, here we are at last. I was asked if I could make special categories for things like this, and I thought that sounded like a really good idea. If you look under the Categories tab at the left you’ll see that from now on anything that I do in a series will have its own special tab. Neat huh?

So here we are on Day 12, I really wanted something absolutely fabulous for this day, since it is our last. We have already done some pretty great recipes though so maybe some simple, super fast salads would be best to end with. I know we have all had that moment occur when you are invited to that last minute impromptu gathering and you have no idea what to bring. These salads go together in a flash and taste great.

This comes from the Florida Ag. Dept., hence the reference to florida products 🙂

Couscous Zucchini Salad

1 1/2 cups Chicken stock (remove excess fat)
1 cup couscous
1/2 cup Florida red pepper, chopped fine
2 teaspoons olive oil
2 medium Florida zucchini or yellow squash, sliced 1/4 inch thick

1 Florida serrano or jalapeño pepper, chopped fine

2 teaspoons Florida garlic, chopped fine

2 tablespoons fresh Florida basil, chopped fine

1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

1 teaspoon salt

1.Bring chicken broth to a boil. Add couscous, red pepper and cover. Remove from heat and let set for 5 minutes.

2.Heat a medium sauté pan. Add olive oil and cook zucchini until tender. Add the remaining ingredients and continue to cook for a few more minutes.

3.Mound couscous in center of a large platter. Arrange zucchini slices around. Serve warm or cold.

Simple Couscous Salad

6 ounces couscous

1 red bell pepper, medium dice
1 green bell pepper, medium dice
1 bunch green onions, sliced on the bias
6 ounces cucumbers, peeled, seeded, medium dice
4 ounces black olives, pitted
6 ounces red onion, julienne

DRESSING:
3 ounces orange juice concentrate
2 ounces water
2 ounces rice vinegar
1 teaspoon garlic, chopped
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon pepper
2 teaspoons fresh oregano, chopped
3 ounces salad oil
1 ounce honey
2 teaspoons fresh thyme, chopped

1. Steam the couscous until tender; set aside to cool.
2. Combine the couscous with the vegetables.
3. Whisk together all the dressing ingredients.
4. Combine the salad ingredients with the dressing. Chill thoroughly before serving.

Simple Salad with Orzo and Herbs

yes, you must use fresh herbs in this salad 🙂

1 pound orzo
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
8 ounces fresh or frozen green peas
4 ounces celery, small dice
12 ounces plum tomatoes, medium dice
1/2 ounce fresh oregano, chopped
1/2 ounce fresh chives, chopped
1/2 ounce fresh parsley, chopped
3 garlic cloves, minced
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
4 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
salt and white pepper, to taste

1. Cook the orzo in lightly salted boiling water until al dente. Drain in a colander and rise well with cold water. Remove the orzo to a large bowl and drizzle 1 tablespoon (15 milliliters) of olive oil around the orzo and toss well.
2. Cook the peas in slightly salted boiling water for 1 to 2 minutes, drain, and rinse with cold water. Toss the peas, celery, tomatoes and orzo together.
3. Combine the remaining olive oil with the herbs, garlic, vinegar, lemon juice, salt and white pepper. Pour over the salad and toss gently to combine. Serve chilled.

I will be on vacation beginning today the 3rd of July through the 7th and will return on the 8th. I hope you all have a wonderful, safe Independence Day.

Our next series of recipes will be Cordials and Liqueurs you can make at home. Some things to gather in preparation for this are:

  • 1 and 2 quart jars with good sealing lids (we will not be canning, but you’ll want good, tight fitting seals
  • 80 and 100 proof vodka various fruits, vegetable and nuts
  • decorative bottles if plan on gifting any of these
  • and a tiny bit of patience…

Many of the recipes I have you will want to double, triple or make even more than that. They are excellent, easy and fun. I promise that with several, if not all of these, you will no longer buy the actual cordial or liqueur. They make wonderful gifts too. Besides cooking, making our own wines, cordials and meads is my favorite past time.

Something I would love is to have is a visit back to these when our 4 week wait is up so everyone who makes them can share their results. So I ask this question…

Would you rather do this series as sort of a weekly or monthly make along type group or just come back and share when you can? I would just really love to know how you all like these 🙂

Let me know via comments or email and I will decide when I get back based on your replies.
Many thanks!

Just a note to let you all know that the Homemadewine.net site will be going down for some maintenance for a few days. I have the tutorial and the glossary moved here so you’ll have them. But access to the recipes will be down. I apologize for the inconvenience!

Have a great Thursday and do something delicious!

Creatively serving the Greater Binghamton area in the lovely Southern Tier of NY. www.foodwineartdesign.com

Colleen is a private caterer and personal chef, she also hosts the internet’s favorite resource for the home wine maker at www.homemadewine.net. Her blog and websites are viewed by thousands each day who enjoy her simply explained, illustrated and photographed recipes and helpful tips.

Rebellious dough

Day 11! We are almost to the end. What shall we do next? Pasta Sauces? How about Cordials? OOOOOHHH! Let’s do Cordials! Will all the summer fruits coming into season that would be fun! Ok…we’ll start 12 days of Cordials starting the 7th of July.  Fun!

Here is our salad for Day 11

Super Easy Grilled Tuna Salad

from the american pasta council – serves 4 as a main course 12 as a side

16 oz fusilli
12 oz fresh tuna steak, cooked rare
3 T olive oil
4 T grey poupon mustard
6 T rice wine vinegar
Grated rind of 3 limes, finely chopped
6 fresh parsley sprigs, chopped
2 T low-sodium soy sauce
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 t dried dill weed
1 c  chopped red bell pepper
1 c  green beans, julienne, blanched
2/3 c red onion, pared, thinly sliced

cut tuna into small bite-size pieces; reserve. Cook pasta; drain and rinse with cold water. Combine all dressing ingredients; mix well. Toss together pasta, peppers, beans, onions, tuna and dressing. If possible, refrigerate salad overnight to allow flavors to blend. Serve cold.

The arm is bad, I won’t know anything until I get an MRI scheduled for next week. Thanks for all the emails, it’s hard to cook like this!!!!!!!!!!! (Here we go again with the whine and pity! 🙂 )

So what are you making for the 4th?  We’re having the Salad form Day 8 some nice grilled veggies and whatever meat I can get form the farms up the road or the farmer’s market. I’m so crunched for time and my schedule is making farmers market visits crazy. Plus it hurts to drive (whine, whine, whine) and I will most likely lose a digit with my newly developed Barney Rubble knife skills thanks to the pain and numbness (God, I still love that line from Top Chef-remember Casey chopping those onions?!?!?) in my arm, ughhh….whine, whine, whine, whine, whine…

All this whining gives me a great idea! Maybe I’ll sit on my behind all weekend and let the family cook and chauffeur me around and I’ll drink wine! Wine, wine, wine, wine… 🙂

Sounds like a great plan to me!

Have a great Wednesday and do something delicious!

Creatively serving the Greater Binghamton area in the lovely Southern Tier of NY. www.foodwineartdesign.com

Colleen is a private caterer and personal chef, she also hosts the internet’s favorite resource for the home wine maker at www.homemadewine.net. Her blog  and websites are viewed by thousands each day who enjoy her simply explained, illustrated and photographed recipes and helpful tips.

Remember that I am not a professional baker so forgive any transgressions you see or hear when it comes to baking. I cook and I cater privately, and some call me a chef (although I do not). Baking professionally is what pastry chefs are for and I will gladly pay them dearly for their services. But I really want to get over that bridge enough that I enjoy and look forward to baking for my family and for small events and parties.

I am so happy to have joined along with Tuesdays with Dorie and I already love the fact that I now have to bake every week. One of my biggest hurdles is me myself and I. Baking became difficult when I had my first MS exacerbation. Washing huge, heavy slippery mixing bowls was very hard for me and I will come right out and say that I broke a pile of them. Like riding horses, baking became one of those things that I put on the back burner. Needless to say baking was just too much work for me, although I do miss my weekly trips to Home Goods and TJ’s to replace my bowls. 🙂 I’m stronger than ever now however, so there is no reason for me to put this off any longer.

So here I am with my first recipe tried…apple cheddar scones. My husband HATES scones. I used to have to make them daily for my cafe so I am very picky about them, and I was immediately drawn to this recipe because it is very much like the way I made them. I feel more comfortable in my own skin already! The crumb is moist yet light…not at all like the “typical scone” which is either much too dry and hard or too cake like for my taste. They were sampled hot out of the oven, warm and at room temperature and even my scone hating husband liked them… and he LOVED them the next day (as did his co-worker who begged “Is she going to bake like this all the time again!??!?!?!” wow! Don’t I feel needed and loved!) I had to make one substitute in the ingredients, and that was with the buttermilk. So I used cultured buttermilk powder reconstituted with 3/4 water and 1/4 raw goats milk…It didn’t affect the taste or texture. I also used organic flour and locally ground organic cornmeal and a fresh egg from a really nice Araucana chicken. Being a foodie farm girl has its benefits 😉

For the baking I used an 11″ round clay baking pan because my injured shoulder didn’t allow the stretch for my cookie sheets and no one was around to do it for me (here we go again with the pity!)

I’m loving baking at home with Dorie already!

Creatively serving the Greater Binghamton area in the lovely Southern Tier of NY. www.foodwineartdesign.com

Colleen is a private caterer and personal chef, she also hosts the internet’s favorite resource for the home wine maker at www.homemadewine.net. Her blog is viewed by thousands each day who enjoy her simply explained, illustrated and photographed recipes and helpful tips.

So here we are on day 10, are you inspired yet?!?!? Todays recipe is adapted a recipe by the American Pork Council and is scrumptious. You’ll make this often, trust me…it’s that good.

Grilled Pork Salad (serves 6)

3 cups grilled pork loin cut to 1/4 inch thick strips, chilled
3 cups cooked Orzo, chilled
1 cup coarsely chopped walnuts
1/4 cup chopped red onion
1 cup cubed fresh pineapple, chilled
1 cup sliced fresh mushrooms
1/2 pound spinach leaves or purple kale
1 cup fresh raspberries
1 papaya, sliced
1/3 cup raspberry vinegar
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 teaspoons honey
1/4 teaspoon salt

Combine raspberry vinegar, olive oil, honey and salt in jar. Cover; shake well. Pour dressing over combined pork, rice, walnuts, onion, pineapple and mushrooms. Toss lightly. Arrange spinach on large serving platter or salad bowl; top with pork mixture.

Arrange raspberries and papaya on top.

Ok…this isn’t a pasta salad but it is so good I had to post it. WOW!

Warm Beet and Onion Salad

From: Weber’s Big Book of Grilling

2   medium golden beets with leafy tops, about 2-1/2 inches in diameter each
2   medium red beets with leafy tops, about 2-1/2 inches in diameter each
    Extra-virgin olive oil

For the dressing:

1   medium orange
1/3   cup extra-virgin olive oil
2   tablespoons red wine vinegar
1   tablespoon finely sliced fresh basil
1   teaspoon minced garlic
1/2   teaspoon kosher salt
    Freshly ground black pepper
 
1   large red onion, cut into four 1/2-inch slices
2   hearts romaine lettuce

Trim the leafy tops from the beets, leaving about 1/2 inch attached; reserve the tops. Leave the root ends intact. Scrub the beets under cold water. Lightly spray or brush with olive oil. Grill over Indirect Medium heat until tender when pierced with the tip of a knife, 1 to 1-1/2 hours depending on size, turning once halfway through grilling time. Remove from the grill and allow to stand until cool enough to handle. Trim the ends from the beets and discard. Rub off the skins. Cut the beets into 1/4 to 1/2-inch slices and place the red beets and the golden beets in separate bowls (to keep the red beets from dying the golden beets red).

To make the dressing: Wash the dry the orange. With a zester, scrape off 1 tablespoon of zest. Alternatively, use a vegetable peeler to remove enough strips of zest to total 1 tablespoon when finely chopped. Reserve the zest.

Cut the remaining skin and white pith from the orange and, working over a separate medium bowl, separate the orange into sections, letting the sections and any juice fall into the bowl. Add the reserved zest and the remaining dressing ingredients to the orange sections, including pepper to taste. Gently stir to combine.

Lightly brush the onion slices with some of the dressing and grill over Direct Medium heat until tender, 10 to 12 minutes, turning once halfway through grilling time. Remove from the grill and allow to cool slightly, then separate into rings.

Rinse the reserved leafy tops of the beets under cold water. Select the smallest, most tender leaves and place with the romaine lettuce in a large bowl. Add half of the dressing and toss. Divide the lettuce mixture among four salad plates. Top with the beets and the onion rings and drizzle on the remaining dressing. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Makes 4 servings.

I missed getting in on the Daring Bakers for July, so I have wait (sniff, sniff) until August. I guess that’s ok since I am headed to the doctors today to have them look at this arm again and see what’s up. I have an overwhelming tolerance for pain, seriously, ask anyone who knows me. This arm is KILLING ME. I can’t sleep, the pain makes me nauseous, I can’t even drive my car without agony. I’ll update you after I spend the majority of the day in the Doctor’s office…ughh….

Have a fabulous Tuesday and do something delicious!

Creatively serving the Greater Binghamton area in the lovely Southern Tier of NY. www.foodwineartdesign.com

Colleen is a private caterer and personal chef, she also hosts the internet’s favorite resource for the home wine maker at www.homemadewine.net. Her blog is viewed by thousands each day who enjoy her simply explained, illustrated and photographed recipes and helpful tips.